Friday, November 13, 2009

#29 - Dave Parker

Card fact: Another rather seriously miscut card. Displaying these cards is making me realize how many of my '75s have miscut/centering issues. Not liking that at all.

What I thought about this card then: Did not see it. But in my formative baseball watching years, Mr. Parker was the MAN. He is the central figure in one of the first things I think of when someone says "All-Star Game." Parker's throw from right field that cut down Brian Downing at the plate during the 1979 All-Star Game in the Kingdome is my strongest All-Star memory. What an amazing throw that was.

What I think about this card now: I find early Dave Parker cards strange just because I cannot get used to the round hat on Parker's head. During those years I watched him with the Pirates, all I knew was the star-covered pillbox cap that he wore.

Other than that, I love the look on Parker's face. We also have the tilted background again. And Parker is displaying Clemente's number on his uniform, so I'm wondering how old this photo might be.

Other stuff: I always wondered what Parker thought of the whole "Pops" Stargell thing. Stargell giving out stars, being looked upon as the patriarch of The Family. Parker seemed to me to be able to take care of himself. He didn't need to call anyone "daddy."

Back facts: I get a kick out of the cartoon. Nothing like advertising beer on a bubble gum card. But what do you expect on the back of a card of someone in the "I'm Badass and You're Not Club"?

Other blog stuff: I'm thinking of calling this either the "Irish flag design" or the "University of Miami design." Or maybe I should ditch referencing the orange all together and simply call it the "lime design."

3 comments:

HandyAndy said...

The "21" patch was worn in 1973:

http://home.mindspring.com/~gearhard/piuniform.html

keith said...

One of the greatest players NOT in the HOF.

Eggrocket said...

Random aside ... Maybe it's just me, but I've always felt listing the player's position as "outfield" was as stupid as saying "infield" for a first/second/third baseman or a shortstop.